December 07, 2021
00 00 00 AM
Let the Fulton Fish Market Handle the Feast
How technology, government efforts, and market action are aligning to address IUU fishing
This Seafood Stew Is Endlessly Riffable
Analysis: Why stockfish should remain important in Nigerian cuisine – Pulse Nigeria
Deadline Today: Will Nations Lose Access to U.S. Seafood Market?
In Samar, tinapa is a celebrated cuisine
Catullo’s Italian in Jacksonville plans a second restaurant in St. Johns County
There’s nothing like a caviar celebration — and it doesn’t need to cost you an arm and an egg
Another Deep-Sea Fish, This One Cannibalistic, Washes Up on San Diego Beach
16 Food Trends Southern Chefs are Looking Forward to in 2022
Latest Post
Let the Fulton Fish Market Handle the Feast How technology, government efforts, and market action are aligning to address IUU fishing This Seafood Stew Is Endlessly Riffable Analysis: Why stockfish should remain important in Nigerian cuisine – Pulse Nigeria Deadline Today: Will Nations Lose Access to U.S. Seafood Market? In Samar, tinapa is a celebrated cuisine Catullo’s Italian in Jacksonville plans a second restaurant in St. Johns County There’s nothing like a caviar celebration — and it doesn’t need to cost you an arm and an egg Another Deep-Sea Fish, This One Cannibalistic, Washes Up on San Diego Beach 16 Food Trends Southern Chefs are Looking Forward to in 2022

Cape House seafood restaurant opens in Incline, replaces Bertie’s

Miranda Jacobson
[email protected]

 

INCLINE VILLAGE, Nev. — What started as a spicy chicken pop-up known as Bertie’s has transformed into sustainable seafood cuisine. The opening of Cape House last week marked the end of an era for Bertie’s, but a new beginning for owner Rick Boyd and the Incline Village community.

“We’re excited to be back into full service dining,” said Boyd.

Many of the new dishes served at Cape House of sustainable fish breeds in order to provide the best price for diners.
Provided/Rick Boyd

In comparison, Boyd explained that Bertie’s mostly served takeout during lunch and dinner hours.



“We did extremely well with Bertie’s, but we definitely need to be able to sit down and have conversations with our customers,” Boyd said.

The original plan to transition into seafood was first halted by COVID, but even as restrictions began to lift again, Boyd found a greater issue with the lack of staffing in the area.

‘;
AdBridg.cmd.push(function() {
var vf_gpt_slot = AdBridg.defineSlot(‘/5195/SNMG_TahoeTribune/ROS/news’, [300,250], vf_div_id).setTargeting(‘slot’, vf_div_id);
var vf_size_mapping = AdBridg.sizeMapping().addSize([320,50]).build();
AdBridg.useSizeMapping(vf_gpt_slot, vf_size_mapping);
AdBridg.display(‘ad-big-box4’);
AdBridg.serve();
})

var r1 = vf_ad_container.closest(‘.vf-promo’);
if (typeof r1 !== undefined) r1.style.display = “block”;

});

});
]]>



“It was difficult finding people while trying to staff Bertie’s for lunch and dinner,” Boyd said. “Some people were working six days a week and not having a life of their own. And moving to full service seafood, obviously the price point goes up and allows us to have a smaller staff and not be there for as long of days.”

The restaurant will now offer full sit down service compared to Bertie’s, which catered to majority takeout orders.
Provided/Rick Boyd

Now, Boyd and his staff are excited to come back refreshed and ready to serve a sustainable menu of seafood items. The sustainability comes from the nationwide struggle currently for some higher-end items, like king crab.

“We haven’t been able to get some things that we would normally have on the menu full time either because they’re unavailable or they’re just unreasonably priced,” said Boyd. “So we’re really trying to focus on sustainable seafood.”

The menu features fish like trout, pacific caught salmon, oysters, red snapper, and other fish that have faster breeding times.

The sign at the restaurant hasn’t been changed, but the new menu has been posted.
Miranda Jacobson/Tahoe Daily Tribune

Cape House officially opened Tuesday, Nov 9, and since then business has been steady. Boyd and his team are excited to continue working out what the business could look like as it moves into the holiday season, as well as connecting with his customers.

“Incline Village is much more of a local community,” Boyd said. “You see a lot of the same faces, even during heavy tourist seasons; they’re not lost in the crowd. So we have to try and have a very strong involvement within the community. That’s been very important to us since we moved here, was to really try to embrace that.”

The restaurant’s hours are from 4:30 to 9 p.m., with reservations preferred. To view the full new menu, and to make reservations, visit cape-house.com, or call 775-413-5050.

For more information on hosting a private party, email [email protected].